Simulation

The value of simulation to training has been recognized since the 1960s with the first simulators being used to help train ultrasonic aircraft pilots, astronauts, and nuclear reactor controllers. What has changed most since then is the affordability of simulators given the steady decrease in the cost of technology. Simulators built a decade ago at a cost of $100M, can now be delivered for $10M. Industries that developed their workforces through apprenticeships – like oil rig drill handlers – now use simulators in their everyday training efforts.

To become an expert developer of simulators requires more than simply hiring computer programmers. Much of what makes a simulator a very effective training tool comes from the quality of instructors, the associated classroom work and the true-to-life training scenarios that go into a simulator-based learning system. As an emerging industry, simulation technologies are evolving rapidly – with new software, new standards, and new visualization methods being invented every day. In such a turbulent technology setting, what is important to remember is that simulators have been proven to cost as much as 95% less to own and operate than traditional live equipment-based training. There is not a military force or large industrial corporation anywhere in the world where simulators do not feature prominently in the future of training operations.

What distinguishes VSD’s simulators?

High degree of accuracy in the simulation – often using actual OEM control systems as the basis for the controls within our simulators

Lean production approaches and timelines – with an intense focus on what is right for the customer, and often resulting in as much as 70% faster delivery times

Superior balance in the training system – achieving a balance between engineering, operation, instructor, budget controller and student interests

Realism of the controls and working environment – with great attention being spent on creating an environment which helps the student engage and learn

High degree of integration – true integration such that the training scenario and environment being run in one simulator is the same as the training scenario and environment in another connected simulator, even if they are physically separated

Simulation Product Groups